Check for breathing

The third step is to check for breathing.

You can check for breathing by Look, Listen, and Feel.

Push down on the forehead while lifting up the chin until the jaw is pointing straight up. Now place your ear over the victim's mouth and LOOK, LISTEN & FEEL for breathing for 3 to 5 seconds. LOOK at the chest to see if it is rising, LISTEN for sounds of breathing and FEEL for air coming from the victim.

If the victim is not breathing, you can perform CPR. It can save a person's life by restoring breathing and circulation until advanced life support can be provided by medical care providers.

Whenever CPR is needed, remember to call for emergency medical assistance. CPR courses teach you to call first (which means to call 911 or your local emergency number before providing treatment) for adult emergencies and call fast (which means to provide 1 minute of care and then call 911 or the emergency number) for emergencies in infants and children.

What CPR Is
The letters in CPR stand for cardiopulmonary resuscitation, a combination of rescue breathing (mouth-to-mouth resuscitation) and chest compressions. If a child is not breathing or circulating blood adequately, CPR can restore circulation of oxygen-rich blood to the brain. Without oxygen, permanent brain damage or death can occur in less than 8 minutes.

CPR may be necessary for children during many different emergencies, including accidents, near-drowning, suffocation, poisoning, smoke inhalation, electrocution injuries, and suspected sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).

Three Parts of CPR
CPR has three basic parts that are distinguished by these easy-to-remember letters: ABC. A is for airway, B is for breathing, and C is for circulation.  

KNOW WHAT TO DO:

CPR

CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION


IT CAN BE AS EASY AS A- B- C:
A - AIRWAY

B - BREATHING

C - CIRCULATION

CONTINUE UNINTERRUPTED UNTIL ADVANCED LIFE SUPPORT IS AVAILABLE.